How do I know what chain I need for my bike?

Begin by counting the number of teeth on the largest front sprocket and largest rear. These numbers are often printed right on the sprockets and cogs. Next, measure the distance between the middle of the crank bolt to the rear axle. This is also the chain stay length.

How do I know what chain to buy for my bike?

When selecting a chain, the first consideration is the number of rear sprockets. The rear cog sets have been made with 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12 sprockets. As the number of cogs on the rear hub increases, the spacing between cogs tends to be reduced.

What speed chain do I need?

If you are using a bike with a derailleur the number of cogs on the rear hub will determine the chain size you will need. They are always 3/32″ chains. You can get a 5/6/7-speed, 8-speed, 9-speed, or 10-speed chains.

How do I know my chain size?

How to Tell What Size Chain You Have

  1. The distance from the center of one pin to the center of the next pin, also known as the “pitch” of the roller chain.
  2. The diameter and width of the roller.
  3. Plate thickness, determined by measuring the plates from one flat side to another.
  4. Plate height is the dimension from the bottom to the top of the plate.
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How often should I change my bike chain?

To avoid this accelerated wear of your cassette and chainrings, a general rule of thumb is to replace your bike’s chain every 2,000 miles. Mind you, this is just a starting point. No two chains will wear at exactly the same rate because no two riders treat their chains the same.

What is a 3 32 chain?

3/32″ (0.094″, 2.30 mm) chain is used on derailer equipped bicycles that have more than 3 cogs at the rear. Even somewhat narrower chain, typically . 090″ or 2.29 mm between the inner plates, is used for derailer-equipped bicycles with 9 or more sprockets at the rear.

What size bike chain do I need single speed?

1/8″ chains are used exclusively for single speed setups. In addition to the other answers, I found it helpful to read that the nominal width of a chain (1/8 or 3/32) actually refers to the width of the sprocket.

Does bike chain Quality Matter?

Your chain is at the heart of your drivetrain and is absolutely crucial to powering your bike forward and to shifting performance. Therefore, with chains, compatibility and durability are a must and mechanical serviceability and even mechanical friction are considerations as well.

What are the different grades of chain?

There are five main grades of chain: 30, 43, 70, 80, and 100. Grade 120 is a newer product available for extremely heavy-duty applications, but it is less common. Each number is the maximum stress that the chain can take per millimeter squared.

What size is standard bicycle chain?

Chains come in 3⁄32 in (2.4 mm), 1⁄8 in (3.2 mm), 5⁄32 in (4.0 mm), or 3⁄16 in (4.8 mm) roller widths, the internal width between the inner plates. 1⁄8 in (3.2 mm) chains are typically used on bikes with a single rear sprocket: those with coaster brakes, hub gears, fixed gears such as track bicycles, or BMX bikes.

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Is my bike chain too short?

You should also see two slight bends at each jockey wheel of the rear derailleur. If the chain is too short, this shift is difficult to make and the derailleur cage is stretched out and almost parallel to the chainstay. If the chain is really short, then you might not even be able to shift into the largest cog.

Chain Link Sizes: How to Measure Chain Link Sizes

  1. Pitch is measured by finding the distance from the center of one pin to the center of the next pin in line. …
  2. Determine your side plate height and thickness by measuring both inside and outside the roller chain to ensure that you’re seeing a good average size.

What are chain sizes?

Chain standards

Size Pitch Maximum Roller Diameter
40 0.500 in (12.70 mm) 0.312 in (7.92 mm)
50 0.625 in (15.88 mm) 0.400 in (10.16 mm)
60 0.750 in (19.05 mm) 0.469 in (11.91 mm)
80 1.000 in (25.40 mm) 0.625 in (15.88 mm)

What is the difference between #35 and #40 chain?

The main difference between the 35 and the 40 chain is that one is rollerless and the other has rollers. The two chains also have different pitches and diameters, which will limit their interoperability. Additionally, the 40 chain is rated for a significantly higher tensile strength and working load than the 35.

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